Kitchen Conversions

Volume vs. Weight

Americans typically measure by volume (cups, etc), while basically everyone else in the world measures by weight. I highly recommend investing in a kitchen scale and measuring everything yourself for the best results. Especially flour. However, here are some basic concepts and conversions to get you started.

Ounces vs. Fluid Ounces

Ounces and fluid ounces are not the same thing. Fluid ounces are still measured by volume! This is why water is always considered to be 8 fluid ounces, whereas 1 cup of flour could weigh anywhere from 3.5 to 5 ounces. Water can make this a confusing concept; it weights 8 ounces on a kitchen scale and is also 8 fluid ounces.

Dry Volume Equivalents

1 pinch = 1/8 teaspoon
1 teaspoon = 1/3 tablespoon
1 1/2 teaspoons = 1/2 tablespoon
1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons = 1/2 ounce
2 tablespoons = 1 ounce
4 tablespoons = 1/4 cup = 2 ounces
5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon = 1/3 cup
12 tablespoons = 3/4 cup
16 tablespoons = 1 cup
1 pound = 16 ounces

Liquid Volume Equivalents

8 fluid ounces = 1 cup
1 pint = 2 cups
1 quart = 2 pints
1 gallon = 4 quarts

Metric to US Conversions

1 ml = 1/5 teaspoon
5 ml = 1 teaspoon
15 ml = 1 tablespoon
30 ml = 1 fluid ounce
100 ml = 3.4 fluid ounces
240 ml = 1 cup
1 liter = 34 fluid ounces
1 liter = 4.2 cups
1 liter = 2.1 pints
1 liter = 1.06 quarts
1 liter = .26 gallon
1 gram = .035 ounce
100 grams = 3.5 ounces
500 grams = 1.10 pounds
1 kilogram = 2.205 pounds
1 kilogram = 35 ounces

Temperature Conversions

275° F = 140° C
300° F = 150° C
325° F = 165° C
350° F = 180° C
375° F = 190° C
400° F = 200° C
425° F = 220° C
450° F = 230° C
475° F = 240° C

Pan Size Equivalents

8×8 inch baking dish = 20×20 cm dish
9×13 inch baking dish = 22×33 cm dish
9 inch cake pan = 22 cm pan
10 inch cake pan = 25 cm pan
9×5 inch loaf pan = 23×12 cm pan

The King Arthur Flour website has an extremely thorough ingredient weight chart, though it will not necessarily provide the same results you see in recipes. For example, I often weigh out a cup of all-purpose flour as 5 ounces, while they note 3.5 ounces. Multiply that, and your cookies will look different from my cookies if you go by their measurements. How much a cup of flour weighs will depend on whether it’s spooned into the cup versus scooped directly from a bag or bin.